Representative Cases

People v. A.C.

-An undercover police officer testified that he bought crack from A.C. Two additional police officers testified that they watched A.C. sell crack to the undercover police officer and moments later arrested A.C. with marked money. Mr. Lynch questioned the police officers about past allegations that they falsely arrested, illegally strip searched, and planted evidence on people. During Mr. Lynch's cross-examination, the judge asked the arresting officer if he wanted to invoke his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. A.C. faced deportation if convicted. A.C. was found not guilty on all charges in Brooklyn Supreme Court.

People v. M.C.

-M.C.'s was accused of punching a man in the jaw and chipping three of his teeth after an argument. Mr. Lynch's cross-examination revealed that the accuser's physical injuries were not consistent with chipped teeth from a fistfight. The complainant admitted under cross-examination that he was testifying against M.C. to obtain money for cosmetic dentistry. M.C. faced deportation if convicted. A jury in New York City Criminal Court acquitted M.C. of all charges after five minutes of deliberation.

People v. S.M.

-Two police officers testified that they recovered a loaded .380 pistol from S.M.'s car seconds after watching S.M. place the gun in his car. S.M. was the father of a young child and accused of charges carrying a sentence up to fifteen years in prison. S.M. was found not guilty of all charges in Brooklyn Supreme Court..

People v. J.F.

-A police officer testified that J.F. was driving under the influence of alcohol with a blood alcohol level of .024 of one percent. J.F faced a year in jail on his first arrest. J.F. was found not guilty on all charges in New York City Criminal Court.

People v. R.M.

-R.M. was accused of robbing a bodega at gunpoint. The robbery was recorded on surveillance video. R.M. was found not guilty on all charges in Brooklyn Supreme Court.

People v. G.G.

-Police officers testified that they recovered a firearm from G.G.'s car. The prosecution alleged that G.G. handwrote a confession. G.G. was found not guilty on all charges in Brooklyn Supreme Court.

People v. R.S.

-A medical professional was pulled over for running a red light. A breathalyzer measured his blood alcohol level at .245 percent of one percent, over three times the legal limit. R.S. avoided a criminal record after Mr. Lynch presented evidence to the prosecution that a misdemeanor conviction on the client would effect impact his medical career and plans to attend graduate school.

People v. J.C.

-A real estate agent was pulled over after swerving and blew a .15 of one percent blood alcohol level in a preliminary breath test. Mr. Lynch negotiated a plea bargain to an unsafe lane charge after the police officer admitted under cross-examination that he had not properly calibrated the breathalyzer.

People v. VC

A college student was arrested after security at a nightclub in Manhattan allegedly recovered 22 methylenedioxymethlamphetamine pills of MDMA (Molly) from him. Mr. Lynch persuaded prosecutors to dismiss the case against his client upon completion of a short drug program.

People v. JA

A Brooklyn man was arrested after police allegedly recovered a quarter of an ounce of cocaine from his car. Mr. Lynch negotiated a plea to disorderly conduct for his client.

In the Matter of A.H.

A father who needed his driver's license to transport his children to school and activities faced a one year license revocation for refusing to take a chemical breath test after a DWI arrest. At the DMV refusal hearing, Mr. Lynch successfully argued that police seized A.H. at an unconstitutional checkpoint and avoided a license revocation for his client.

P.M. v. City of New York, et al.

-A janitor leaving work was questioned by police officers about a crime that he witnessed. He complained when an officer tried to physically detain him. He was falsely accused of a crime, pepper sprayed, and tased. Mr. Lynch negotiated a substantial settlement for his client's false arrest, pain, and physical injuries.

M.J. v. City of New York, et al.

-A teenager was sitting on the stoop of her building when police officers ordered her to leave for no apparent reason. When she refused, police officers falsely accused her of a crime and violently arrested her. Mr. Lynch obtained a sizeable settlement for his client's false arrest, pain, and physical injuries.

M.N. v. City of New York, et al.

-NYPD falsely arrested a mother of two children for obstructing governmental administration after she refused to let police officers into her home without a search warrant. Mr. Lynch negotiated a substantial settlement for her false arrest.

R.E. v. City New York, et al.

-A college student was falsely arrested and slammed to the ground by police officers after she called police to mediate an argument with a store owner. Mr. Lynch obtained a sizeable settlement for his client's false arrest, pain, and physical injuries.

J.C. et al v. City New York, et al.

-Police officers falsely arrested a grandmother, her daughter, and granddaughter after a shooting suspect abandoned his firearm near the family's front door. Mr. Lynch negotiated a substantial settlement for their false arrest.